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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Symptoms, Self-Help, and Treatment for Obsessions and Compulsions

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) In This Article

It’s normal, on occasion, to go back and double-check that the iron is unplugged or your car is locked. But if you suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors become so excessive they interfere with your daily life. No matter what you do, you can’t seem to shake them. But help is available. With treatment and self-help strategies, you can break free of the unwanted thoughts and irrational urges and take back control of your life.

What is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable, unwanted thoughts and repetitive, ritualized behaviors you feel compelled to perform. If you have OCD, you probably recognize that your obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors are irrational—but even so, you feel unable to resist them and break free.

Like a needle getting stuck on an old record, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) causes the brain to get stuck on a particular thought or urge. For example, you may check the stove 20 times to make sure it’s really turned off, or wash your hands until they’re scrubbed raw.

Understanding OCD obsessions and compulsions

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by unwanted thoughts and repetitive, ritualized behaviors you feel compelled to perform. If you have OCD, you probably recognize that your obsessions and compulsions are irrational—but even so, you feel unable to resist them and break free.

Understanding obsessions and compulsions

Cycle of violence

Obsessions are involuntary thoughts, images, or impulses that occur over and over again in your mind. You don’t want to have these ideas, but you can’t stop them. Unfortunately, these obsessive thoughts are often disturbing and distracting.

Compulsions are behaviors or rituals that you feel driven to act out again and again. Usually, compulsions are performed in an attempt to make obsessions go away.

For example, if you’re afraid of contamination, you might develop elaborate cleaning rituals. However, the relief never lasts. In fact, the obsessive thoughts usually come back stronger. And the compulsive rituals and behaviors often end up causing anxiety themselves as they become more demanding and time-consuming. This is the vicious cycle of OCD.

Most people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) fall into one of the following categories:

  • Washers are afraid of contamination. They usually have cleaning or hand-washing compulsions.
  • Checkers repeatedly check things (oven turned off, door locked, etc.) that they associate with harm or danger.
  • Doubters and sinners are afraid that if everything isn’t perfect or done just right something terrible will happen, or they will be punished.
  • Counters and arrangers are obsessed with order and symmetry. They may have superstitions about certain numbers, colors, or arrangements.
  • Hoarders fear that something bad will happen if they throw anything away. They compulsively hoard things that they don’t need or use.

Signs and symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Just because you have obsessive thoughts or perform compulsive behaviors does NOT mean that you have obsessive-compulsive disorder. With OCD, these thoughts and behaviors cause tremendous distress, take up a lot of time, and interfere with your daily life and relationships. For example, you may check the stove 20 times to make sure it’s really turned off, or wash your hands until they’re scrubbed raw.

Most people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have both obsessions and compulsions, but some people experience just one or the other.

Obsessive thoughts

Common obsessive thoughts in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include:

  • Fear of being contaminated by germs or dirt or contaminating others
  • Fear of losing control and harming yourself or others
  • Intrusive sexually explicit or violent thoughts and images
  • Excessive focus on religious or moral ideas
  • Fear of losing or not having things you might need
  • Order and symmetry: the idea that everything must line up “just right”
  • Superstitions; excessive attention to something considered lucky or unlucky

Compulsive behaviors

Common compulsive behaviors in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include:

  • Excessive double-checking of things, such as locks, appliances, and switches
  • Repeatedly checking in on loved ones to make sure they’re safe
  • Counting, tapping, repeating certain words, or doing other senseless things to reduce anxiety
  • Spending a lot of time washing or cleaning
  • Ordering or arranging things “just so”
  • Praying excessively or engaging in rituals triggered by religious fear
  • Accumulating “junk” such as old newspapers or empty food containers

The link between hoarding and OCD

The compulsive behavior of hoarding—collecting and keeping things with little or no use or value—is a common symptom of people with OCD. However, people with hoarding symptoms are more likely to also be suffering from other disorders, such as depression, PTSD, compulsive buying, kleptomania, ADHD, skin picking, or tic disorders.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms in children

While the onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder usually occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, younger children sometimes have symptoms that look like OCD. However, the symptoms of other disorders, such as ADD, autism, and Tourette’s syndrome, can also look like obsessive-compulsive disorder, so a thorough medical and psychological exam is essential before any diagnosis is made.

Self-help for OCD tip 1: Invest in self care

Your lifestyle plays a big role in how you feel; it can help you manage your anxiety and function better.

Exercise regularly

Exercise is a natural and can be a highly effective anti-anxiety treatment. It can help control OCD symptoms by strengthening your nervous system helping you to refocus your mind when obsessive thoughts and compulsions arise. For maximum benefit, try to get 30 minutes or more of aerobic activity on most days. Ten minutes several times a day can be as effective as one longer period especially if you pay mindful attention to the movement process.

Stay connected to family and friends

Obsessions and compulsions can consume your life to the point of social isolation. In turn, social isolation will aggravate your OCD symptoms. It’s important to invest in relating to family and friends. Talking face-to-face about your worries and urges can make them feel less real and less threatening.

Get enough sleep

Not only can anxiety and worry cause insomnia, but a lack of sleep can also exacerbate anxious thoughts and feelings. When you’re well rested, it’s much easier to keep your emotional balance, a key factor in coping with anxiety disorders such as OCD.

Practice relaxation techniques

Stress can trigger symptoms or make them worse. Mindful meditation, yoga, deep breathing, and other relaxation techniques can help lower your overall stress and tension levels and help you manage your urges. For best results, practice a relaxation technique regularly.

Recognize the role trauma may play in your OCD

In some people, OCD symptoms such as compulsive washing or hoarding are ways of coping with trauma. If you have post-traumatic OCD, cognitive approaches may not be effective until underlying traumatic issues are resolved.

Self-help for OCD tip 2: Learn how to resist OCD rituals

If you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), there are many ways you can help yourself. One of the most powerful strategies is to eliminate the compulsive behaviors and rituals that keep your obsessions going.

Don’t avoid your fears

It might seem smart to avoid the situations that trigger your obsessive thoughts, but the more you avoid them, the scarier they feel. Instead, expose yourself to your OCD triggers, then try to resist or delay the urge to complete your relief-seeking compulsive ritual. If resistance gets to be too hard, try to reduce the amount of time you spend on your ritual. Each time you expose yourself to your trigger, your anxiety should lessen and you’ll start to realize that you have more control (and less to fear) than you think.

Refocus your attention

When you’re experiencing OCD thoughts and urges, try shifting your attention to something else.

  • You could exercise, jog, walk, listen to music, read, surf the web, play a video game, make a phone call, or knit. The important thing is to do something you enjoy for at least 15 minutes, in order to delay your response to the obsessive thought or compulsion.
  • At the end of the delaying period, reassess the urge. In many cases, the urge will no longer be quite as intense. Try delaying for a longer period. The longer you can delay the urge, the more it will likely change.

Anticipate OCD urges

By anticipating your compulsive urges before they arise, you can help to ease them. For example, if your compulsive behavior involves checking that doors are locked, windows closed, or appliances turned off, try to lock the door or turn off the appliance with extra attention the first time.

  • Create a solid mental picture and then make a mental note. Tell yourself, “The window is now closed,” or “I can see that the oven is turned off.”
  • When the urge to check arises later, you will find it easier to re-label it as “just an obsessive thought.”

Self-help for OCD tip 3: Challenge obsessive thoughts

Like a needle getting stuck on an old record, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) causes the brain to get stuck on a particular anxiety-provoking thought. The following strategies can help you get unstuck.

Write down your obsessive thoughts or worries

Keep a pad and pencil on you, or type on a laptop, smartphone, or tablet. When you begin to obsess, write down all your thoughts or compulsions.

  • Keep writing as the OCD urges continue, aiming to record exactly what you're thinking, even if you’re repeating the same phrases or the same urges over and over.
  • Writing it all down will help you see just how repetitive your obsessions are.
  • Writing down the same phrase or urge hundreds of times will help it lose its power.
  • Writing thoughts down is much harder work than simply thinking them, so your obsessive thoughts are likely to disappear sooner.

Create an OCD worry period

Rather than trying to suppress obsessions or compulsions, develop the habit of rescheduling them.

  • Choose one or two 10-minute “worry periods” each day, time you can devote to obsessing. Choose a set time and place (e.g. in the living room from 8:00 to 8:10 a.m. and 5:00 to 5:10 p.m.) that’s early enough it won’t make you anxious before bedtime.
  • During your worry period, focus only on negative thoughts or urges. Don’t try to correct them. At the end of the worry period, take a few calming breaths, let the obsessive thoughts or urges go, and return to your normal activities. The rest of the day, however, is to be designated free of obsessions and compulsions.
  • When thoughts or urges come into your head during the day, write them down and “postpone” them to your worry period. Save it for later and continue to go about your day.
  • Go over your “worry list” during the worry period. Reflect on the thoughts or urges you wrote down during the day. If the thoughts are still bothering you, allow yourself to obsess about them, but only for the amount of time you’ve allotted for your worry period.

Create a tape of your OCD obsessions

Focus on one specific worry or obsession and record it to a tape recorder, laptop, or smartphone.

  • Recount the obsessive phrase, sentence, or story exactly as it comes into your mind.
  • Play the tape back to yourself, over and over for a 45-minute period each day, until listening to the obsession no longer causes you to feel highly distressed.
  • By continuously confronting your worry or obsession you will gradually become less anxious. You can then repeat the exercise for a different obsession.

Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

The treatment for OCD with the most research supporting its effectiveness is cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder involves two components: 1) exposure and response prevention, and 2) cognitive therapy.

Exposure and response prevention for OCD

Exposure and response prevention involves repeated exposure to the source of your obsession. Then you are asked to refrain from the compulsive behavior you’d usually perform to reduce your anxiety.

For example, if you are a compulsive hand washer, you might be asked to touch the door handle in a public restroom and then be prevented from washing up. As you sit with the anxiety, the urge to wash your hands will gradually begin to go away on its own. In this way, you learn that you don’t need the ritual to get rid of your anxiety—that you have some control over your obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors.

Studies show that exposure and response prevention can actually “retrain” the brain, permanently reducing the occurrence of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms.

Cognitive therapy for OCD

The cognitive therapy component for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) focuses on the catastrophic thoughts and exaggerated sense of responsibility you feel. A big part of cognitive therapy for OCD is teaching you healthy and effective ways of responding to obsessive thoughts, without resorting to compulsive behavior.

Other OCD treatments

In addition to cognitive-behavioral therapy, the following treatments are also used for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD):

  • Medication – Antidepressants are sometimes used in conjunction with therapy for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, medication alone is rarely effective in relieving the symptoms of OCD.
  • Family Therapy – Because OCD often causes problems in family life and social adjustment, family therapy is often advised. Family therapy promotes understanding of the disorder and can help reduce family conflicts. It can also motivate family members and teach them how to help their loved one.
  • Group Therapy – Group therapy is another helpful obsessive-compulsive disorder treatment. Through interaction with fellow OCD sufferers, group therapy provides support and encouragement and decreases feelings of isolation.

Helping a loved one with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

The way you react to your loved one’s OCD symptoms has a big impact. Negative comments or criticism can make OCD worse, while a calm, supportive environment can help improve the outcome of treatment. Try to be as kind and patient as possible.

Tips for helping a friend or family member with OCD

  • Avoid making personal criticisms. Remember, your loved one’s OCD behaviors are symptoms, not character flaws.
  • Don’t scold someone with OCD or tell them to stop performing rituals. They can’t comply, and the pressure to stop will only make the behaviors worse.
  • Do not play along with your loved one’s OCD rituals. Helping with rituals will only reinforce the behavior. Support the person, not their rituals.
  • Keep communication positive and clear. Communication is important so you can find a balance between supporting your loved one and standing up to the OCD and not further distressing your loved one.
  • Find the humor. Laughing together over the funny side and absurdity of some OCD symptoms can help your loved one become more detached from the disorder. Just make sure your loved one feels respected and in on the joke.

If stress and worry are contributing to your OCD symptoms, FEELING LOVED can help.

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Resources and references

General information about obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Information Guide – Guide to the symptoms, causes, and treatment of OCD for people with the disorder and their loved ones. (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)

OCD Guides – Download PDF guides for adults, teens, college students, and parents of children with OCD. The guides offer encouraging information about OCD and its treatment. (OCD Chicago)

What You Need to Know About Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (PDF) – Learn all about obsessive-compulsive disorder, including the signs, symptoms, and how it's treated. (International OCD Foundation)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children – Guide to obsessive-compulsive disorder in children, including common symptoms and behaviors. (KidsHealth)

Self-help and helping a loved one with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

What to Do During Obsessing and Stopping Your Compulsions – Offers self-help skills you can practice on your own and use to combat obsessions and compulsions. (Anxieties.com)

Family, Friends and Carers – Information on how to take care of yourself while helping a loved one with obsessive-compulsive disorder. (OCD UK)

Help for Partners and Families – Advice on how to support a loved one with obsessive-compulsive disorder. (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)

Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

How to Find the Right Therapist – Guide to finding professional help for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Includes questions to ask a potential therapist. (International OCD Foundation)

OCD Medication – Fact sheet on medication for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Includes information about side effects and treatment success rates. (Understanding OCD)

Support groups for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Find a Support Group – A searchable database of OCD support groups. (International OCD Foundation)

What other readers are saying

“I just want to commend you for the best up-to-date and comprehensive information I've seen online regarding OCD. I am an OCD awareness advocate as my son recovered from severe OCD several years ago. My goal is to get the word out that OCD, no matter how severe, is treatable.” ~ Florida

“I have had OCD and anxiety problems . . . and sometimes it is such a seemingly hopeless, uphill struggle. This article is truly a Godsend, with all the advice you have so graciously doled out for free.” ~ Texas

“Your article has helped so much. I lose myself in my OCD sometimes. It’s ruined so many moments of my life, which then makes me feel like a bad person. I go above and beyond to help people and animals and I’m still so hard on myself for my OCD. This article really helped.” ~ New York

Authors: Melinda Smith, M.A., and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D. Last updated: May 2016.